1. Remnants of the Warsaw Ghetto wall

    The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest of all the Jewish ghettos in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II. The death toll among the Jewish inhabitants of the ghetto is estimated to be at least 300,000. 

  2. March of the Living

    I will be in Poland and Israel for the next two weeks with students, educators, and Holocaust survivors from around the world. On Holocaust Memorial Day (Yom HaShoah), I will march silently from Auschwitz to Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration camp complex built during World War II. I will post photos and share more about my experience when I get back on May 7th. 

    "When you listen to a witness, you become a witness."

  3. Anne Frank and her older sister Margot in August 1940.

    Anne Frank and her older sister Margot in August 1940.

  4. "By remaining vigilant against those who seek to perpetrate violence and murder, we honor those we lost during one of the darkest periods in human history. And we keep their memory alive for generations to come." —President Obama on International Holocaust Remembrance Day

    "By remaining vigilant against those who seek to perpetrate violence and murder, we honor those we lost during one of the darkest periods in human history. And we keep their memory alive for generations to come." —President Obama on International Holocaust Remembrance Day

  5. the-big-lie:

Female survivors standing outside a barracks in the newly liberated Lenzing concentration camp. On May 5, 1945, troops of the 80th Infantry division, accompanied by photographers from Combat Unit 123, liberated the camp. Lenzing, Austria, May 5, 1945.

    the-big-lie:

    Female survivors standing outside a barracks in the newly liberated Lenzing concentration camp. On May 5, 1945, troops of the 80th Infantry division, accompanied by photographers from Combat Unit 123, liberated the camp. Lenzing, Austria, May 5, 1945.

  6. And that is why I swore never to be silent whenever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere. When human lives are endangered, when human dignity is in jeopardy, national borders and sensitivities are irrelevant. Whenever men and women are persecuted because of their race, religion, or political views, that place must -at that moment- become the center of the universe.

    — Elie Wiesel in his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech

  7. nbcnews:

92-year-old Holocaust survivor moves back to Berlin
(Photo: Don Snyder / NBC News)
Margot Friedlander hid for 13 months before being discovered in April 1944 and sent to Theresienstadt Concentration Camp in what is now the Czech Republic.
Continue reading

    nbcnews:

    92-year-old Holocaust survivor moves back to Berlin

    (Photo: Don Snyder / NBC News)

    Margot Friedlander hid for 13 months before being discovered in April 1944 and sent to Theresienstadt Concentration Camp in what is now the Czech Republic.

    Continue reading

  8. the-seed-of-europe:

U.S. soldier William Best meets 19-year old Joseph Guttman, whom he liberated from the Buchenwald concentration camp, New York 1948.

    the-seed-of-europe:

    U.S. soldier William Best meets 19-year old Joseph Guttman, whom he liberated from the Buchenwald concentration camp, New York 1948.

  9. pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War Begins
Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.
Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.
Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    pbsthisdayinhistory:

    April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War Begins

    Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.

    Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.

    Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.

    Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  10. halftheskymovement:

As Women’s History Month comes to a close, let us pause to reflect on nine things women in America can do in 2014 that they could not do in 1914:
1) Marry a foreigner and keep their citizenship.
2) Have equal access to job listings.
3) Seek damages for sexual harassment.
4) Lose a job or promotion because of pregnancy — or potential pregnancy.
Learn more via Huffington Post. 

    halftheskymovement:

    As Women’s History Month comes to a close, let us pause to reflect on nine things women in America can do in 2014 that they could not do in 1914:

    1) Marry a foreigner and keep their citizenship.

    2) Have equal access to job listings.

    3) Seek damages for sexual harassment.

    4) Lose a job or promotion because of pregnancy — or potential pregnancy.

    Learn more via Huffington Post